Vaccine Posts: 2003

Posts from the PSP Yahoo Group from 2003

Vaccine Discussion: 2003 Posts

 

Disclaimer

These posts have not been checked for accuracy but are instead listed to show the complexity and emotionality of the vaccinne issue and the content is for general informational purposes only.

 

The content of these web pages is not a substitute for medical advice; ParkSlopeParents.com is not intended to, and does not, provide medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Do your homework, consult credible sources, and please fully understand the consequences your parenting decisions.


Never disregard professional medical advice, or delay in seeking it,because of something you have read on the PSP Yahoo! Group or on the PSP.com web site.

 

Never rely on information in this e-mail or on our web site in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you need help finding a doctor, specialist, or other provider, our website has a extensive list of recommendations from our members:  

 

 

May 26, 2003

Actually I am so glad you sent your note to the group! I am really
interested in starting a vaccine awareness group and would love to know if
others would be interested. I feel so alone with my unorthodox approach to
vaccines and still get strong-armed into one or two by my Dr. I appreciated
so much reading your email regarding the MMR and your knowledge regarding
that particular vaccine reawakened my feelings. I would love to hear from
others who would be interested in starting some kind of forum for
information and support for those who are not keen on vaccines. My nanny
shocked me by informing me that her two teens were forced to receive a Sars
vaccine in order to continue school in Queens!! If the respnse is good I
promise to start a group!! Thanks J. Nelson

 

May 26, 2003

ok good:)
i am so glad to find another parent who share similar views about vaccines! i
have tons of info and other parent who feel the same and i would be happy to
share that with you!
i am *strongly* against the current recommended vaccine schedule and it is very
disterbing to me how many parents blindly accept it or make the decision without
doing the research for themselves. there is a sea of knowledge out there i wish
other parents would delve into.
i have the greatest respect for parents struggling with the decison. and i feel
like it was one of the hardest tasks i had to tackle in my parenting so far!
and wow...i can't believe your nanny was strong armed into a vaccine for her
children. many parents are unaware of the current expemtion policies....i urge
every parent to look into them. no one(not the state, federal government or your
doctor can force you to vax your kids!)
have you looked at amitymama.com? many parent in the incredablly large online
community find alternative schedules, delay vax or don't vax their children. it
is an exellent community for support and knowledge!
good luck with your idea to form a support group to share vaccine info. do you
mean a local group? i wonder how many parents in the neighborhood share similar
beliefs!?

 

 

May 26, 2003

I'm so glad this posting came up now...

My daughter will be starting "school" in the fall and I just received all the paperwork that needs to be filled out prior to her attending.  There is a completely comprehensive list of vaccinations that they "require."  While she has received some vaccines, there are others that we just simply don't feel are necessary and have chosen to forgo.  Does anyone know how the schools handle this situation?  We certainly aren't going to pump her full of vaccines just to get admitted to preschool (or elementary school for that matter). 

If anyone has experience with a similar set of circumstances, we'd really appreciate the input.

Thanks!

 

 

I believe it is important to be mindful and respectful of the community we
are all a part of on this parent list.
I am wondering whether we can address our questions and concerns directly,
rather than resorting to words such as "creepy". It is legitimate for
someone to wonder and ask for clarification. However I found
the e-mail which raised this question disrespectful.

Personally, it is very clear to me why dr. xxx prefers not to sign her
name each time at the bottom of the e-mail. This would seem like an
advertisement rather than an individual offering her feedback. I am very
grateful that she chooses to offer her thoughts and support to all of us.
Her commitment to her community is one of the things that make life in park
slope so wonderful!

 

May 26, 2008

Thank you for your thoughtful post.  Dr. xxx, as a member of the community, I hope that you will also continue to post on the list in whatever way you feel most comfortable.

 

 

May 26, 2003

Okay so you have all made it very clear you liked the unsigned contributions from Dr. xx. I however, joined this group because of my horrible treatment by her and her partner and was reaching out for support and new Dr. recommendations. I received literally dozens of letters back from parents who also had horrible experiences with them. I guess they were unable to comment. It is amazing to me that she finds the time to write back to a local parent group which could only benefit her practice but can't find more than one cold line to reply to a parent who wrote to her expressing their feelings and concerns. I also think if we are all signing with our names, she should do the same. If anyone is interested in the vaccine awareness support group idea, they can contact me at xxxxxx.....Otherwise I am no longer a member of this group.

 

May 26, 2003

 

I general, schools are subject to state and federal regulations regarding
vaccinations. It's not the individual decision of school, or even the district.
Schools also have opt-out procedures, which require you to fill out some
paperwork. You can opt-out for religious and health reasons (and probably for
other reasons that I just can't think of now). The NY State Department of
Education website, or the NYC Ed Dept. website can give you more info.

 

May 26, 2003

just wanted to point out...

there are three types of exemptions...religous, philosophical and medical. each
state offers medical and religous ones and half the states(not ny) offer
philisophical. however ny state has a broader idea of religous exemptions then
others, and offers this exemption without you having to belong to a church or
religous group...so it can be used to your advantage just like a philosophical
exemption.

i know it is confusing and all the laws differ greatly by state, but it is well
worth it to do the research...cause you don't have to be "forced" to vax your
child if you have objections to them...you reasons are your own and you must
make these choices in the best interst for your own family...and not be
pressureed by any insitution!

 

 

May 26, 2003

I am vaccine free having used the "philosophical/ religious" out to attend
public school my entire life. My daughter (6 months) will be traveling
internationally and we have decided to give her some, but not others and on
a new schedule that we created with our sympathetic doctor.
Does anyone have any idea/info on how the 'some, but not others' fits into
the rejection options offered by the govt? It seems more solid ground
legally to say "No, I don't believe in them philosophically" as my parents
did, than to say I believe in some, but not others.
Any ideas?

 

May 27, 2003

this is where it gets really hard if you selectivly vax and not omit them all
with exemptions. many parents have told me that once they vax anything...their
exemptions get denied unless they are medical. seems like the state looks at
this and doesn't think your philosophical or religous concerns hold enough sway.

i hope you can work something out. cause evryone in ny state i know who has
tried this had a difficult legal battle. however from what i have seen... the
state has allowed more people to site religous/philosophical objections if it is
the MMR they refuse...as it is the most controversial one. oh and the prevnar
shot too since there is no long term studies done on it yet...and just look what
happened with infants dying from the rotovirus shot just a few years back!

good luck!

 

May 27, 2003

>> ...and just look what happened with infants dying from the
rotovirus shot just a few years back!

Just to clarify, the rotavirus vaccine was an oral vaccine, not a
shot -- like the oral polio vaccine, since the germ is contracted
from the gut, the oral vaccine causes the secretion of protective
antibody in the gut, thus extinguishing the germ at its point of
entry. No one died from the vaccine, but some children developed a
kind of intestinal obstruction called intussiception, which was
thought to to be related to vaccination. Some of these children
needed surgery to reduce the intestinal obstruction. The vaccine
was taken off the market, but since then, continuing studies have
indicated that the risk of intussiception is much lower than was
originally thought and that pulling the vaccine may have been an
overcautious response. The vaccine surveillance system was
effective in identifying an apparent risk, and it was appropriate to
stop vaccinating and reexamine the question, but a new form of the
vaccine is currently under development. Every winter children are
hospitalized with rotavirus infection, usually only for a day or two
of iv therapy, but only 20 to 40 deaths per year result from
rotavirus in the US. In developing countries, it is a significant
cause of infant mortality (1400 deaths per day). Signed, local
pediatrician.

 

May 27, 2003

sorry for the confusion...here is some info from The New England Journal of
Medicine.

"A new study confirms that the rotavirus vaccine does indeed increase the risk
of intussusception, a rare form of intestinal blockage.

The vaccine was pulled from the market in 1999, after reports of intussusception
occurred within the first 7 months of vaccine use, more than double the cases
reported in the previous seven years.

Intussusception occurs when the intestine telescopes into itself, causing an
obstruction of the bowel that is repaired surgically. During the studies to
support licensing of the rotavirus vaccine, only 5 cases of intussusception were
reported among more than 10,000 infants who received the vaccine.

Rotavirus is the number one cause of severe diarrhea in infants and is
responsible for countless visits to the doctor's office and, sometimes, the
emergency department.

An investigation of vaccinated infants confirms that the vaccine was indeed the
cause of the complication.

Seventy-four infants out of a total of 426 infants with intussusception had
received the rotavirus vaccine, the report indicates, and most of these infants
had intussusception shortly after their vaccination.

Within the first 14 days after vaccination, the risk of intussusception was 10
times higher than normal, the authors report, and within the first 7 days after
vaccination, the risk was 14 times higher than normal.

If the national rotavirus vaccination program were to continue, the
investigators estimate that the intussusception rate would increase by 28% to
57%, or an additional 361 to 732 cases per year. "

just trying to show that the research should be done BEFORE any child is put at
risk...and not AFTER! i believe there is a report of an infant death after
surgery..i will go hunting for the info...

as a local pediatrician...i am wondering what is your stance on vaccines? i am
very curious now wth your new participation on the list.

i was quite disturbed by this statement of yours : "The vaccine
was taken off the market, but since then, continuing studies have
indicated that the risk of intussiception is much lower than was
originally thought and that pulling the vaccine may have been an
overcautious response." ...what is your souce for this infomation? do you really
believe that it was "overcautious" to pull this vaccine? yikes!

 

May 27, 2003

sorry for the confusion...here is some info from The New England
Journal of Medicine.
>
>

No date given for your quotation, but it would seem to date from'99,
when the vaccine was pulled. For a review of the ongoing research
since then, see the Journal of Infectious Diseases, April 2003,
p1301, Reappraisal of the Association of Intussiception with the
Licensed Live Rotavirus Vaccine Challenges Initial Conclusions, and
p1309, The First Rotavirus Vaccine and Intussiception:
Epidemiological Studies and Policy Decision. These two articles
give a good review of the history of this issue, and also an
interesting look at how these public health policies are hammered
out. My subspecialty training was in infectious diseases, so I am
interested in these topics, but it is also my professional
responsibility to stay informed and up to date. By the way, if you
look at the membership listing, it appears that I signed on to this
group about 2 months after you did, and I have posted from time to
time since joining, both from my perspective as a local doc and
children's advocate, and as a parent and long time member of the
community. Regards.

 

May 27, 2003,

I just wanted to put in my $.02 on the discussion of the vaccine issue. We
had this discussion several months ago and it was terminated because people
could not amicably discuss it. People feel very passionately on this
subject, and for some reason, don't seem to be able to respect people who
have differing opinions. If you cannot discuss the issue without trashing
people on the other side, please take your opinions off-list to a group that
supports your opinions.

I think that this also extends to the discussion of local pediatricians, and
Dr. Xxx specifically. I think that Dr. Xxx has been practicing long
enough to know that her office is not going to be a good fit for EVERY
parent in Park Slope. She may even value knowing why a specific patient left
her practice for another doctor. But that doesn't mean that she should be
treated with disrespect or flamed. I value her participation on the list,
and I hope that she continues to add her professional opinions, as well as
her non-professional tips. She is a parent too

I had a bad experience with one of the local pediatricians that many people
on this list really love. I left his practice, my son and I are happy with
our new pediatrician, life goes on. Does this mean that my former
pediatrician is terrible and everybody ought to stay away from him? No.
Would I be offended if he was a member of the list? No.

Since this is an email list of parents, I hope that we can treat all list
members with the respect that they deserve.

 

May 27, 2003,

Disagree does not =disrespect

 

May 27, 2003

In the spirit of open minded discussion I have some questions I wanted to
ask people who take an interest in this subject.

I have a friend in the UK who is just completing a book about the MMR
vaccine controversy. He was interested in knowing whether people in the US
have heard of the Geier research and whether they have any opinions on it.
He is also interested to know whether people are concerned with the issue
of thimerosal in the MMR vaccine or the vaccine more generally. And
finally, he wondered if anyone knows if there are any attempts to challenge
the vaccination requirement more broadly than using religious of
philosophical objections to allow the children of parent's who opted out of
vaccinations to attend school.

I don't want to monopolize the forum so if anyone does have any opinions
I'd love to hear them off line (i.e. just email me not the group)

 

May 29th, 2003

> In the spirit of open minded discussion
>

I've just finished reading the 2 articles linked to Nancy
McDermott's post under this heading. I would recommend that anyone
who has a chance takes the time to read them, because they examine
really intelligently the way we get and assess information
nowadays, and particularly the role of journalists in determining
what we think about. Not just in decisions about our kids and the
way we live, but about politics, world events and so on, it becomes
increasingly necessary to be able to assess the quality of the
information we receive. And information tends to arrive in a deluge
(eg CNN, the Sunday Times). Also, the sources of information are
becoming increasingly centralized, cf the current battle with the
FCC over media deregulation. My training included many tedious
hours of learning how to assess the objectivity, reliability , and
statistical soundness of published data, and a significant part of
my professional responsibility is to sort out this information on
behalf of my concerned patients. These two articles pointed out to
me the need to be similarly analytic when trying to assess
information in the popular media. Thanks for the very interesting
post.

 

May 27, 2003

It is one thing disagree  to with immunizations and to post references with the aim of having an open debate about this issue. It is another to imply that Dr. xxx has a cavalier attitude to children's health. Frankly, I thought that her initial response was pretty balanced and her subsequent reply was also useful and somewhat restrained when you consider the implications of the post she was replying to.

I think it is a good thing for people to stand up for what they believe in, but when it takes the form of sarcasm and personal attacks it ultimately undermines their credibility.  I know there is a lot of interest in this subject but I can't see that a discussion of it is going to be very productive if it carries on the way it has started out.

 

 

May 27, 2003

I agree wholeheartedly. Let us please keep this polite and open minded. No one study is definitive in scientific research. It is important to consider all of the evidence in making any decision.

To add something that Dr. xx mentioned briefly in her message but that has not really been addressed directly. Here in the U.S., our open access to vaccines means that all kids are at lowered risk for these deadly infections. However, children in developing countries are not so fortunate, and their parents don't have the luxury of choice. These infections kill thousands of children around the world every year.

Anything that we take to effect our health, whether it be a vaccine, a medication, or even a natural remedy, effects the body and therefore holds some sort of risk. Scientific studies weigh the intended effects against the 'side' effects to be sure that the good outweighs the bad. With childhood vaccinations, the good has outweighed the bad in a big way. They are the primary reason that we in the U.S. now have an average life expectancy of 75 or so, instead of around 45 in the developing world. In our great grandparents day, it was not unusual to lose one or more of your children to polio, diptheria, etc. My babysitter's grandfather died of tetanus in the Caribbean. Now, these ailments are practically unheard of in the U.S. Smallpox is considered gone.

I think we are fortunate to have such advanced and readily available medical care in this country. That doesn't mean I dismiss anyone's legitimate concerns when we hear of vaccine side effects and I welcome hearing about all of these viewpoints. We all want the best for our kids here, or we'd be spending our email time in some other way! I just wanted to add another wrinkle.

May 27, 2003

Does anyone advocate that NO children receive many of these vaccinations?

Of course not.

If we stopped all vaccination of children, or even if we stopped much of it, there would be dire consequences.

Diseases that are now almost unheard of would return.

 

Because of the developement of and use of these vaccines, many diseases that once maimed and killed our children are now almost eradicated. 

SOME of us now have the "luxury" to choose not to vaccinate our kids.

And as long as MOST of us still continue to do so, these diseases will continue to be kept at bay.

This luxury to not vaccinate only exists because others still do.

I don't know, but it sure sounds a little bit elitist.

 

As part of a community, sometimes we must participate in certain activities, to ensure that WE ALL remain healthy.  I have no doubt that if I chose not to vaccinate my child, that he would be safer. But only if others continued to put THEIR children at risk. 

Thank goodness for them.

 

 

May 27, 2003

This is a very, very, very important point and I was trying to figure out how to articulate it but xxx beat me to it. I've been surprised by how many people in our community are considering vaccinations optional, and it begs the question of whether our neighborhood would be more at risk for some of these illnesses if any ever makes a comeback. I sure hope not.

 

May 27, 2003

In the spirit of open minded discussion I have some questions I wanted to
ask people who take an interest in this subject.

I have a friend in the UK who is just completing a book about the MMR
vaccine controversy. He was interested in knowing whether people in the US
have heard of the Geier research and whether they have any opinions on it.
He is also interested to know whether people are concerned with the issue
of thimerosal in the MMR vaccine or the vaccine more generally. And
finally, he wondered if anyone knows if there are any attempts to challenge
the vaccination requirement more broadly than using religious of
philosophical objections to allow the children of parent's who opted out of
vaccinations to attend school.

"'Public duped by media over MMR' was the headline-grabbing claim emerging from a survey published on 19 May 2003 by the Economic and Social Research Council (1). On cue, the British press promoted yet another piece of junk science from the anti-MMR campaign."
http://www.spiked-online.com/articles/00000006DDBF.htm


Myths of Immunity

"Popular beliefs about the dangers of immunisation to the immune system and the assertion of the principles of consumer sovereignty now risk putting the whole programme of mass childhood immunisation in jeopardy."
 http://www.spiked-online.com/Articles/00000002D418.htm


I don't want to monopolize the forum so if anyone does have any opinions
I'd love to hear them off line (i.e. just email me not the group)

 

May 27th, 2003

Re: [parkslopeparents] Vaccines, Pediatricians, and list behavior

 

From Tim Murphy:

When topics such as:
BREAST FEEDING,
CO-SLEEPING,
VACCINES,
CIRCUMCISION, etc.
arise, there are strong feelings on all sides of the issues.
The passions can almost be cult-like. Do a Google search, and you'll see
that most of the info that pops up on these issues is inflamed rhetoric,
with tiny bits of pure scientific data mixed in (and difficult to weed out).
If you discuss how YOU have chosen to raise YOUR child with other parents,
try not to do as though it is a given that they feel exactly the same way as
you.
Odds are they do not, at least not on every issue.

And when people get the feeling that their parenting decisions are being
questioned-let alone questioned by anonymous neighbors on the
internet-passions may rise even further. No one likes to be judged about
their parenting choices.

We live in Park Slope, after all.
And if we can't co-exist with diverse opinions HERE....
...where can we?

 

May 27th, 2003

Thanks soo much for finally stressing that factor of the whole vaccine discussion. I'm very disturbed by the aggressive tone some parents who oppose the "traditional" approach use. It makes me think they forget that their choices are only possible because of other people taking the community oriented approach.

Also since I'm already posting, I'm always very interested in Dr. xxxx input and appreciate it a lot.

Antje

 

 

May 29th, 2003

> In the spirit of open minded discussion
>

I've just finished reading the 2 articles linked to xx
xx post under this heading. I would recommend that anyone
who has a chance takes the time to read them, because they examine
really intelligently the way we get and assess information
nowadays, and particularly the role of journalists in determining
what we think about. Not just in decisions about our kids and the
way we live, but about politics, world events and so on, it becomes
increasingly necessary to be able to assess the quality of the
information we receive. And information tends to arrive in a deluge
(eg CNN, the Sunday Times). Also, the sources of information are
becoming increasingly centralized, cf the current battle with the
FCC over media deregulation. My training included many tedious
hours of learning how to assess the objectivity, reliability , and
statistical soundness of published data, and a significant part of
my professional responsibility is to sort out this information on
behalf of my concerned patients. These two articles pointed out to
me the need to be similarly analytic when trying to assess
information in the popular media. Thanks for the very interesting
post.

 

 

 

June 4, 2003

Re: [parkslopeparents] Re: Vaccine awareness support group

 

I've just read all of the "vaccine" emails and am very disturbed. Dr. xxx
is a doctor and until we can practice medicine (on people) it is fair to say
she knows more than we do and there is NO reason to trash her. Second, should
we remind ourselves that there are vaccines for a reason - to prevent
epidemics. When you choose to not vax your child for whatever reason, not only
are
you putting your child at risk if these things were to go around but every other
child. Vaccines aren't 100%, but what about the children with low immune
systems who will someday be in your child's class? Is it fair to put them at
risk? Because if your child does catch an infectious disease beliefs or no
beliefs the school will remove him until it's safe to let him back. Third, you
can delay certain shots so that your child may be a little older if you think
they are too young to handle it. Maybe thinking about how these vaccines affect
society as whole will give people a better perspective. Someone had a good
point about other countries, they don't have the same luxury of medical
treatments and vaccines as we do and that's why they have more diseases. I
guarantee they would jump on it if offered because they know what the alternative
is.Thanks for listening to my tangent.

 

June 4th, 2003

Not a tangent at all. Vaccines are not just for the good of those
getting shots; they're for the good of the whole community. That's one
reason it's such an emotional issue. People who realize the importance
of vaccines know that those other folks are making a decision that not
only endangers their own child, but the public health.

Remember, other than smallpox, we haven't wiped out any of those
diseases. Polio, TB, measles, etc... they're a threat to children in
many parts of the world. The reason we don't feel the threat here is
that almost everyone gets their shots. It always makes me shake my head
when I hear this debate.

Can we move on to the fluoride in the water? ;)

 

 

June 5, 2003

From the moderators:

Let's all put this one to rest -- this is the official
call to end the vaccine thread.

June 5, 2003

"....I have come to peace with my choice not to vax and I am not forcing
that on anyone. "
-Alison

...unless your child becomes infected with a disease that a vaccine may have
prevented, and then brings it with him or her to school, or to play.

Of course the odds of this happening are very, very, low (thankfully).
Care to guess why?

 

June 5, 2003

Actually, not vaccinating your child does force something on everyone. It forces us all to be at increased risk for a resurgence of these infections. Don't assume that people who accept current medical thinking have done so blindly. I would also encourage everyone to be informed about this issue and, most important, to be careful of the sources for information. Just because something is written down does not make it true or 'scientific.' Our best medical evidence at this point in time, based on well-designed studies, indicates that the benefits of the current vaccine schedule outweigh the risk.

 

June 6, 2003

I believe we had a call from our moderator to end this thread and I
think we should respect that decision. Everyone certainly has had a
chance to speak their mind about the issues...

Perhaps if people want to continue going over it they might do it
off-line.

The discussion has been very helpful to me in thinking through the
issues.

 

June 5, 2003

Hi all -

The recent vaccine emails (but don't worry! I'm not going to say
anything about the pros & cons of vaccination) reminded me of a
conversation I recently had with my doctor about the availability of
a vaccine for just measles instead of the MMR. He said that the
reason why he doesn't offer it is that he has to buy his vaccines in
lots of ten & put up the money first, and then the insurance company
reimburses him as he uses up the vaccines. He has to use up the
vaccines before they expire, and he just doesn't get the demand for a
simple measles shot.

That got me to thinking. I wonder if there are 10 parents out there
who want just the single shot measles vaccine for their child. If
that is the case, maybe we could go to him en mass & request the
vaccine. If you are committed to a single shot measles to the point
of putting up the money up upfront for the vaccine and getting it
back from the insurance company, send me an email directly. I have
no idea if the doctor will even do it, so it's most likely that
nothing will come of this. I see one problem that he might not want
to see a number of children just to give them a shot if they have
other doctors. But as they say, nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Okay, that's my three emails for the week. At least one was one
topic!

 

June 7, 2003

I am sending this email to the whole list, not just to Elena, because it is information that some other people may find useful. I asked my pediatrician about getting single shots for the mmr and she told me that the Rubella shot is available in single doses but the measles and mumps are not yet -- apparently there was a shortage of vaccines and they have not yet built the supply back up. But there will likely be single doeses of these available in 2004.  I am interested in finding out more about the single measles shot and would be willing to commit to purchasing it in advance if ten parents are needed. I would want to check with my pediatrician first -- perhaps your doctor could order it but she could administer it? I don't know if this would make any sense.  Also, if your doctor can get it, maybe mine can too.  Who is your doctor?  I am also curious to know whether anyone who plans to give their child the m, m, and r shots (in single doses, perhaps) has any thoughts on delaying.  I want to know when these illnesses are most prevalent (it wouldn't make sense to delay the shot if the greatest risk of contracting the illness is earlier) and when it might be reasonable to delay until.  (I plan to read about this as well.)  I hope this information and these questions are not taken as and do not lead to any objectionable debate about the pros and cons of vaccinating.

Thanks.

 

 

Part 3

 

Sept. 25, 2003

I have a question about baby vaccinations and airplane travel.

We're expecting our first baby Nov 2. As we have a lot of family in France,
we want to travel to France with the baby over the holidays (only time my
husband can take vacation), leaving Dec 27 for 2 weeks. The pediatrician
we've met advises vaccination before plane travel (due to risk of exposure
on the plane, but not once in France), and says we can start vaccinating at
6 weeks. However, if our baby is late (a distinct possibility for 1st-time
mom), we'll be cutting it very close to get the baby vaccinated in time
since we want to do it at least a few days before the trip, in case of any
slight sickness that results from the vaccination.

I know some people feel you don't need to vaccinate at all, or at least not
as early as many books say (staring 1-2 months!) but I wondered if anyone
else had experience with plane travel with such a young baby and can advise
on how they handled the vaccination question.

 

 

Sept. 26, 2003

Hi,

I have traveled a lot to Europe with my kids. I've found it always
easy when they were so little because they sleep pretty much through
the entire flight. (At least outbound) You can ask for a bassinet in
which the baby can sleep. Usually the first shots trigger a light
fever in a newborn. I've noticed that with both my children and I
always regretted that I hadn't waited a bit longer because they were
so miserable.

How could a a newborn child possibly catch Hepatitis B on a palne? I
find it very unlikely that a baby can catch any of these deseases
(Tetanus, Diphteria)on a plane at this young age.

However, some kids are just fine after their shots and don'tshow any
symptoms.